Ellen Onione, Terry Feld’s student lawyer, asked for feedback on her advice letter’s opening paragraph.

Use the checkoxes to let Ellen know whether the introduction prepares Terry to read and remember the letter’s content. Then write your own opening paragraph and compare your introduction with Ellen’s final rewrite.

Dear Ms. Feld;

The issue of “no pets” clauses in residential tenancy leases has arisen in Canadian courts many times and judges have considered those clauses in various ways. Your situation raises the issue of whether a “no pet” clause in your lease gives your landlord grounds to end your tenancy. Your landlord orally told you to move at the end of the month because you did not get rid of your golden retriever, Bingo. This letter will explain the grounds and process for evicting a tenant because of a pet and then recommend next steps we can take on your behalf.

Listen to pointers from Ellen’s supervising lawyer

Audio Transcript (.pdf. 91 kb)

Will Terry know:

“What’s Coming?”

Yes
No

“Why It’s Important?”

Yes
No

“How It’s Relevant?”

Yes
No
Write your opening paragraph here.
 

Dear Ms. Feld;
After our meeting last week, I reviewed your lease and the law on “no pet” clauses. Courts do no enforce "no pet" clauses. You cannot be evicted because you signed a lease with a “no pet” clause and you later bought a dog, Bingo. Your landlord can only evict you if Bingo creates a nuisance by disturbing other tenants. Also, the landlord must first give you notice in writing with valid reasons for an eviction; he cannot tell you orally to move. I recommend we write to the landlord to tell him the Clinic represents you and that you will not be moving out at the end of the month.